Tag Archives: reducing cesareans

Bringing Birth Back: A New Infographic for Parents on Lowering the Odds for a Cesarean

1 Oct

Bringing Birth Back: The Rise of Cesareans & the Movement to Safely Prevent Them is a review of the rise in U.S. cesarean rates, the risks of the surgical procedure and how parents can take advantage of the new practice guidelines to lower their odds for a medically unnecessary cesarean.

Mothers’ choices for how they want to give birth is theirs to make and should be respected. This easy-to-read format gives mothers information they may not have to help them make an informed decision on how they want to give birth. You can upload this helpful infographic from the nursing website.

Bringing Birth Back
Source: TopRNtoBSN.com/

Turning a Breech is a Safe Option for Women with a Prior Cesarean

5 Mar

Breech presentation occurs in 3-4% of all term pregnancies and is the third most common reason for performing a cesarean in the U.S. More than 90% of breech babies are delivered by planned cesarean section. External Cephalic Version (ECV), a procedure that helps to turn a fetus from a breech presentation to a cephalic presentation has been shown to decrease the incidence of breech presentation at term for women without a cesarean scar thereby reducing the need for a cesarean section.  However, a study published in the January 2014 issue of  the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology   suggests it is safe for women with a prior cesarean to have an external cephalic version (ECV) in a medical center. This allows women to labor for a VBAC and reduce exposure to complications from a repeat cesarean.

The researchers in Spain compared a group of 70 low risk women with a prior cesarean with 387 low risk women with a prior vaginal birth who had an external version at or after 37 weeks of gestation.  happy mother with newborn babyAll women were expecting one baby. Physicians were successful in turning a breech in 67.1% of women with a cesarean scar and 66.1% of women with a prior vaginal birth. There were no complications in the group of women with a prior cesarean. Of the women with a prior cesarean 52.8% had a vaginal birth (VBAC). More than half of the women avoided a repeat cesarean section. Of the group of women without a prior cesarean 79.4% had a vaginal birth.

The authors of the study concluded that in addition to the 270 documented cases of uncomplicated ECVs for women with a prior cesarean, their data on 70 additional women that underwent the procedure without a uterine rupture or fetal mortality indicates that ECV is a safe option for women with a prior cesarean who want to labor for a VBAC.

Concern from the medical community for the complications of cesarean section and its impact on mothers and babies is mounting. Recently the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society For Maternal-Fetal Medicine issued Obstetric Care Consensus Statement: Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery which called for physician restraint in performing cesarean sections. The guidelines offered safe directives for preventing the first cesarean including offering a breech version to women to reduce the odds for a cesarean section.

This study on the safety of external cephalic version for women with a prior cesarean adds to the existing evidence and may encourage clinicians to also offer the procedure to women with a prior cesarean who may want to labor for a VBAC.

Resources for Mothers

American Academy of Family Physicians

What Can I Do If My Baby is Breech?

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, U.K.,

Turning A Breech Baby In The Womb

 

 

The Power To Push Campaign Has It Right When It Comes To VBAC

5 Oct

The Power to Push Campain was created in 2010 by the British Columbia Women’s Hospital and Health Center to  reduce cesarean rates and help women make informed decisions about VBAC, elective primary or repeat cesareans.

Based on the latest evidence and respect for women’s ability to make their own decisions about how best to give birth, the Power To Push project has developed  well balanced, easy to understand consumer education booklets that tell it like it is. Resources in five different languages include brochures on VBAC, vaginal breech birth, and ECV, external cephalic version, a safe method of turning a breech around the 37th week of pregnancy. Their website also includes videos featuring real women sharing their personal birth stories and wisdom. Theresa’s VBAC story is honest, encouraging, and unusual given that her OB encouraged her to consider a VBAC. Women can also take the Birthing Misconception Quiz to increase their knowledge about cesarean and VBAC.

At the hospital’s Best Birth Clinic, women can be referred to the Choices in Childbirth Counselling Service where women can meet with a Registered Clinical Counsellor to discuss their concerns, and receive current, evidence-based information on the risks and benefits of cesarean birth.

Everyone involved in the Power To Push Campaign is committed to supporting women’s choices and helping them have the best birth possible. The U.S. can certainly benefit from this exemplary model of care aimed at reducing cesareans and increasing access to VBAC.


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